Artist Inspiration – Mel Bochner

Artist Influence, Artist Influences, Studio, Studio 3, Uncategorized
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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

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‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant to be Viewed as Art’, (1966)

 

I am very interested in the conceptual works of Mel Bochner, in particularly his 1966 exhibition ‘Working Drawings and Other Visible Things on Paper Not Necessarily Meant To Be Viewed as Art’. In this exhibition, Bochner assembled a collection of working drawings from artists including Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Eva Hesse and Robert Smithson, as well as from mathematicians, choreographers and engineers. Bochner curated these drawings into four identical volumes of reproduced, copied images of the originl drawings and filed them into binders. These binders were placed upon plinths in the gallery for the public to view.

These working drawings proposed ideas for art, thus creating the work through the manifestations of such created in the viewers head, the work becomes at once universal and deeply personal as what one viewer can imagine from a proposal may be entirely different to the next. These works, which are inherently conceptual, display the notion of art as what one can propose, and can assemble, rather than something which needs to be physically created.

I am very interested in the work of Bochner, in particularly the way that he has displayed the information he has gathered. A large part of my practice which I am currently struggling with is how to display my work effectively, as I have not created anything persay but rather have completed an investigation and the products of my research are what I want to display to the viewer. I am particularly interested in the way that he has used the ‘aesthetics of administration’ in order to bestow upon the work an element of labour from the viewer as the flick through the files, much like they would in an office setting. I am interesting the way that he has collected information, and compiled this within the files in order to produce a work which is the outcome of his curated investigation into what a working drawing can be dependant on the artist. In my own work, I would like to explore a method of display which utilises these administrative aesthetics as well as involving a form of labour within viewing the work, much like the labour of creating the work.

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